We know healthy relationships can impact our physical well-being. So can love. Love is not just a psychological experience; love transforms biology.​

Scientific research shows that by merely observing acts of compassion, your immunity is enhanced.

A Harvard University study found that college students increased their production of salivary antibodies (which strengthen our immune systems) when watching a film of Mother Teresa comforting a child. Conversely, their antibody levels fell when watching war scenes.

Similarly, a University of Iowa study found a correlation between close emotional relationships and ovarian cancer survival rates. Of the 168 women followed from the time of their surgery, those who reported feeling "strong support" were 13 percent less likely to die of the disease during the study period.

Although we don't usually consider love in scientific terms, over the past 25 years, studies have proven indisputably that the experience of love benefits our physiology.

Taking care of your relationships not only feels good, it actually enhances your vitality. We'll put this concept into action in Step 4. But first, let's talk about toxic relationships.

Click the "Next" button to move to Step 2, where you'll learn how to handle toxic relationships.

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